MyAmericanFuture

MyAmericanFuture
MyAmericanFuture

Wednesday, July 31, 2013

July 31, 2013: July 2013 Recap

[A recap of the month that was in AmericanStudying.]
July 1: Revolutionary Realities: The French: A series on re-viewing the Revolution starts with how much we need to say merci to our friends across the Pond.
July 2: Revolutionary Realities: Benedict Arnold: The series continues with how we remember our most notorious traitor, and how we should.
July 3: Revolutionary Realities: Ethan Allen: The inspiring and significantly less inspiring sides to the Green Mountain Boys, as the series rolls on.
July 4: Revolutionary Realities: The Declaration and Race: A July 4th special on race and the nation’s founding document.
July 5: Revolutionary Realities: The Adams Letters: The series concludes with how much we can learn from John and Abigail Adams’ letters.
July 6-7: A Crowd-sourced Revolution: More Revolutionary thoughts and ideas from fellow AmericanStudiers—add yours!
July 8: Southwest Stories: Mary Hunter Austin: A series on the Southwestern U.S. begins with the many sides to one of the region’s foremost chroniclers.
July 9: Southwest Stories: Taos: The series continues with three compelling stories connected to one small New Mexico town.
July 10: Southwest Stories: Los Alamos: AmericanStudying the site of our most famous and controversial research project, as the series rolls on.
July 11: Southwest Stories: Rudolfo Anaya: The Southwestern writer whose debut novel redirected American literature—and was just the beginning.
July 12: Southwest Stories: Southwestern Mysteries: The week’s series concludes with a post on some compelling regional mysteries, past and present.
July 13-14: Southwest Stories: Folk Heroes: But wait! The series is extended with this special post on Southwestern folk heroes, cross-posted from my contribution to William Kerrigan’s great blog.
July 15: AmericanStudies Daytrips: Battleship Cove: A series on New England daytrips commences with the limitations and possibilities of Fall River’s military memorial.
July 16: AmericanStudies Daytrips: Plimoth Plantation: The series continues with the multiple complex and impressive sides to this living history site.
July 17: AmericanStudies Daytrips: Fort Warren: How this Harbor Island site brings light and darkness to the American past, as the series rolls on.
July 18: AmericanStudies Daytrips: Concord: Three reasons to visit one of America’s most historic and defining spots.
July 19: AmericanStudies Daytrips: Native American Museums: The series concludes with three distinct but complementary New England museums.
July 20-21: William Kerrigan’s Guest Post: Scholar and fellow AmericanStudies blogger William Kerrigan on Searching for Johnny Appleseed in Massachusetts.
July 22: AmericanStudying Ambiguous Hits: “American Pie”: A series on how AmericanStudies can help us analyze ambiguous pop classics commences with Don McLean’s ballad.
July 23: AmericanStudying Ambiguous Hits: “Buddy Holly”: The series continues with the ambiguous nostalgia at the heart of Weezer’s first big hit.
July 24: AmericanStudying Ambiguous Hits: “Cleaning Out My Closet”: Personas, art, and the confessional in Sylvia Plath and Eminem, as the series rolls on.
July 25: AmericanStudying Ambiguous Hits: “Like a Prayer”: The long-term historical contexts for Madonna’s controversial classic, and how we should really remember it.
July 26: AmericanStudying Ambiguous Hits: “State Trooper”: The series concludes with two ways to analyze one of Springsteen’s most ambiguous tracks.
July 27-28: Crowd-sourced Hits: Fellow AmericanStudiers add their takes on the week’s songs and other ambiguous classics—share yours, please!
July 29: American Families: The Mathers: A series on multi-generational American families kicks off with three generations of one of New England’s founding families.
July 30: American Families: The Adams: The series continues with all that Henry Adams had to live up to, and why I believe he did.
The American Families series resumes tomorrow,
Ben
PS. Any topics you’d like to see covered in this space? Guest Posts you’d like to write? Lemme know (brailton@fitchburgstate.edu)!

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